Australia’s Best Surfing Spots

Australia is known as one of the best places for surfing in the world. With a vast 50,000km of coastline, Australia offers more beaches, bays, and inlets than you could possibly imagine.

Photo: depositphotos.com. Bondi Beach, Sydney, Australia

Photo: depositphotos.com. Sydney, Australia

Australia is recognized as one of the world’s famous surfing destinations. The reason is that its first-class waves make for the best surfing beaches. Besides world-renowned Bells Beach on the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Byron Bay in New South Wales, and the aptly-named Surfers Paradise in Queensland – it’s the ‘off the beaten trail’ surfing destinations that often promise the best waves and conditions.

Everyone who comes to Australia is eager to surf, because it’s the most famous and popular activity in the country.  Along with a feeling of excitement, you might be terrified due to a natural fear of sharks and other things lurking in the ocean. You should not be afraid, however, as long as you have complete information about the bays you’re planning to surf in, the landscape of the coast and the depth of the sea in that  location, as well as information about its inhabitants.

What is a better activity than to get a true Australian experience? Sun, sea, sand and surf. It had to be done. The Pass at Byron Bay, New South Wales

Photo: depositphotos.com. Byron Bay beach, New South Wales, Australia

Photo: depositphotos.com. Byron Bay beach, New South Wales, Australia

Byron Bay in New South Wales is a paradise for board riders. It offers  great variety of beaches to select from. Here everyone finds his perfect surfing place: from beginners to experienced professionals. Located at the end of Clarkes Beach, it is perpetually ranked as one of the main surfing destinations in Australia. Byron Bay takes in a cluster of surf beaches to the north and south of Cape Byron, the eastern most point in Australia. The town of Byron Bay became popular among surfers in the 1960s and has been a must-visit on the international surf-safari trail ever since.

Torquay – Bells Beach, Victoria: This is a truly historical spot for surfers all over the world. The reason is that Torquay is considered the home of Australian surfing. So, it is very special for anyone who cares about surfing culture. In fact, today it is still the site of the country’s oldest and most popular professional surfing event, the Rip Curl Pro. The winner of this contest receives the traditional clanging bell trophy. Swells from the Southern Ocean flow over the shallow reefs to become a fascinating surf that can rise up to five meters or more.

Crescent Head, New South Wales: The coastline stretches from north of Port Macquarie to Crescent Head, and it is connected with Point Plomer Road, which stretches for 25kms along the coast. Crescent Head Point has stunning right-hand waves that break across 400 meters in perfect condition. Crescent Head Front Beach has a variety of left-hand barreling waves in a combination of north and  south swell directions. The Point and Front Beach are protected when there is a south wind. Every year in May, Crescent Head Point plays host to one of Australia’s major Malibu events.

Surfers catching big waves at Snapper Rocks on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia

Surfers catching big waves at Snapper Rocks on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Photo: depositphotos.com

Snapper Rocks, Queensland: One of Australia’s most well-known waves and still one of the best, crowds aside. It’s the place that gave birth to many of the world’s leading professional surfers, like Mick Fanning and Parko. The name was given to this spot due to its excellent fishing, but nowadays it has gained more popularity for its heavy takeoffs and world class tube sections. Approachability and good waves have made the breakers here very crowded.  Snapper Rocks, located at Rainbow Bay, is home to the world popular ‘Super Bank,’ a wave that is recognized as the longest and hollowest in the world. The swell here can easily reach six to eight feet and cover a distance of almost two kilometers. Some of the most prestigious world surfing events are held here, such as the Quiksilver and Roxy Pro, Rip Curl Masters, and MP Classic.

South Cape Bay, Tasmania:  Intense, clear waves, and cold-water breakers await you in South Cape Bay in Tasmania. Tasmania’s beaches offer visitors a great wide coastline, white sparkling sand, long waves, and an incredible opportunity (for many surfers this is the most significant issue in choosing the right place to surf) to catch waves in an absolutely uncrowded place. It is relaxed and calm, especially compared to other popular spots. Travelling to South Cape Bay, Australia’s southernmost surf beach, is part of the fun with a 7.7-kilometer trek through World Heritage-listed wilderness – which is the only way to access it.

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